Battleship Memorial Park, Mobile, Alabama

These images were made in June, 2007.  Click on a thumbnail to see the larger image. 

Battleship USS Alabama (BB-60)


Additional photographs made in June, 2012.

Battleship USS Alabama Battleship USS Alabama Officer's Desk Battleship USS Alabama Battleship USS Alabama: Fresh Water
Battleship USS Alabama Battleship USS Alabama Battleship USS Alabama war ration book Battleship USS Alabama
Battleship USS Alabama BB-60 Battleship USS Alabama Battleship USS Alabama Battleship USS Alabama
Battleship USS Alabama BB-60 Battleship USS Alabama Battleship USS Alabama Code Room and pneumatic tubes for decyphered document transmittal Battleship USS Alabama Radio Central
Battleship USS Alabama Radio Central Battleship USS Alabama Radio Central Battleship USS Alabama Radio Central Battleship USS Alabama Radio Central

 

USS Drum (SS-228)

 

... and a Douglas C-47


Additional photographs made in June, 2012.

Submarine USS Drum American flag Submarine USS Drum forward torpedo room Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum
Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum attack computer
Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum engine room
Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum Submarine USS Drum
Submarine USS Drum engine room Submarine USS Drum aft torpedo room Submarine USS Drum aft torpedo room Submarine USS Drum aft torpedo room
Submarine USS Drum aft torpedo room Submarine USS Drum aft torpedo room    

Battleship USS Iowa (BB-61)

Okay, technically the USS Iowa (BB-61) is unrelated to the USS Alabama (BB-60).  The Alabama is a South Dakota  class battleship and the Iowa is a Iowa-class battleship, but the photos below are remarkable and show what it looked like when the USS Alabama fired its 16-inch guns.  The difference in class is that the Iowa-class ships were a bit longer.  My understanding is that the South Dakota class battleships were too short to provide the needed stability to accurately target the long-range weapons.  That is one reason the USS Alabama was retired almost immediately after the end of WW II.  Nevertheless, both the Alabama and the Iowa carried the same 16-inch guns.  These photos were taken by Scott Fawcett in 1984 off the coast of Venezuela.  He has graciously allowed me to published his photographs on this web page.  

 

 

Look carefully at the right-hand edge of the above photograph.  You can see the 16-inch shell in flight!

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