NASA Kennedy Space Center

These photographs were made in June, 2010.  Click on an image to download a full high-resolution version.  

Sorry, I couldn't resist the symbolism of this photo

given the uncertainly of NASA's manned spaceflight

program in the Summer of 2010. 

 

The Apollo-Saturn Launch Control Center

The Apollo-Saturn Launch Control Center  

Five F-1 engines of Saturn V first-stage.

The mighty Saturn V F-1 engine.

Five J-2 engines of the Saturn V second stage.

Five F-1 engines of Saturn V first-stage.  The mighty Saturn V F-1 engine. Five J-2 engines of the Saturn V second stage. 

Single J-2 engine powering the Saturn V third-stage

Reaction control motors on the Service Module.

Interior of  the Apollo Lunar Module.

Single J-2 engine powering the Saturn V third-stage Reaction control motors on the Service Module. Interior of  the Apollo Lunar Module.

Apollo 14 Command Module Kitty Hawk

Apollo 14 Command Module Kitty Hawk

Apollo 14 Command Module Kitty Hawk

Apollo 14 Command Module Kitty Hawk

Apollo 14 Command Module Kitty Hawk on display at the Saturn V Center.  This spacecraft was

flown into lunar orbit on a mission that launched 31 January 1971 with astronauts Alan B. Shepard, Jr.,

Stuart A. Roosa, and Edgar D. Mitchell aboard. 

Lunar EVA spacesuit of Alan B. Shepard, Jr.

Lunar EVA spacesuit of Alan B. Shepard, Jr.

Apollo spacesuit  lunar EVA glove.

Lunar EVA spacesuit of Alan B. Shepard, Jr. Lunar EVA spacesuit of Alan B. Shepard, Jr. An Apollo spacesuit  lunar EVA glove.

Alan Shepard's Chevrolet Corvette Stingray. 

It's so cool that Shepard's car is preserved and

displayed at KSC.  I lived in Satellite Beach,

Florida, through the entire decade of the 1960s,

and the sleek, fast, Corvette, driven by an

astronaut probably symbolizes the time and place

better than any other symbol, even more so than

the rockets that took them into space. 

Alan Shepard's Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

Alan Shepard's Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

Mercury Mission Control Center

Mercury Mission Control Center

Mercury Mission Control Center

Mercury Mission Control Center

The Gemini 9A spacecraft that was launched into

Earth orbit on 3 June 1966 carrying astronauts

Command Pilot Thomas P. Stafford and Pilot

Eugene A. Cernan on a 3-day mission. 

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